Archive for the '[Science in Society]' category

Donors Choose!

Oct 10 2010 Published by under [Et Al], [Science in Society]

It's the official launch day!

I absolutely LOVE Donors Choose! I have been donating to projects there since I was a wee Drugmonkey reader back in the day. I even gave my sister and her husband a Giving Card for their wedding present, and the best part of the gift was the packet of hand-written thank-you notes they got from the students.

Now it's my chance to spread the love to Donors Choose through my own blog! All you K99/R00ers, please show your appreciation through my Giving Page! Not only that, but HP is matching every donation up to $50K total, so every little bit you chip in will be doubled. How awesome is that?!

One response so far

Could the NanoKids play soccer with a Buckyball?

Well I HAD to take minute to blog this!! Sir Harry Kroto answered my question!

So, those NanoParents better buy some of these NanoCars to drive the NanoKids to soccer practice, so someday they can play in the big leagues!*

*(this particular nerdy joke courtesy of my postdoc advisor)

**anybody else think it is awesome that he proudly displays a mini-Spam wall on his shelf? I would not be surprised to find out that Spam contains C60.

3 responses so far

Ask a Nobel Laureate: Harry Kroto

So Nobelprize.org is running some online media activities through Youtube and Facebook where you get to ask Nobel Laureates questions and they will answer them. Pretty cool, right? The last round of questions went to David Gross, Nobel Prize in Physics, 2004, and you can find more from previous rounds at the Youtube page.

This round features Harry Kroto, one of the chemists who originally discovered the strange but fascinating Buckyball structure of carbon (C60, aka fullerene). Buckyballs have enjoyed much trendiness in the field of chemistry, because they have some weird properties that make them do interesting things with electrons and and interact with other molecules and surfaces in some unique ways. Apparently, they have also been found in space??!! I do not claim to be a C60 Buckyball expert, or even know much about them at all other than that in the early 2000's, if you wrote a grant with the terms "Buckyball" and "HIV" somewhere in the title or abstract, you were pretty much guaranteed to get funded. They were so hot right now. However, these nifty little hollow sphere-like molecules have turned out to be quite interesting and popular, evidenced by the thousands of papers in the literature exploring their physical, chemical and biological properties.

For the "Ask a Nobel Laureate" feature, you submit your questions either by uploading a video to Youtube or in text form--and although a video would be pretty fun to do, given my pseudonymity and lack of time for overly creative pursuits, I'm going to submit mine via blog post cartoon. My question is.... (drumroll..............):

Given the relative molecular scales, if the Nanokids held a World Cup tournament, would they be able to use Buckyballs to play? Or would it end up more like Big Ball Soccer?

Go to the Nobelprize.org Google Moderator or Youtube site and vote for your favorite question!! (mine, of course!)

4 responses so far